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Kenro Izu: Sacred Places, Limited Edition (with Platinum Print)

Publisher: Santa Fe, New Mexico: Arena Editions, 2001
Edition: 1st Edition
Binding: Hardcover
ISBN: 1892041596
Condition: New / No dust jacket as issued
Item #: 100557

$600.00

Specifics

First edition, first and only printing. Limited edition of 100 numbered copies, signed by Izu, in a deluxe clamshell box, with an original 10 x 12 inch (image size is 6-1/2 x 9 inches) platinum print, a different version of "Pyramid of Sakkura, Egypt, 1985" which is reproduced in plate 21 in the book (print edition of 100 also numbered and signed by Izu).

Hardcover. Fine yellow cloth, with dust jacket (dust jacket was not issued with the limited edition, but is included). Photographs by Kenro Izu. Essay by Clark Worswick. 188 pp. with 103 tritone plates, beautifully printed on fine matte art paper by EBS, Verona, Italy. 10-1/4 x 12-1/4 inches. Out of print.

Condition

New in publisher's packaging.

Description

From the publisher: "During the 1980s, Kenro Izu began making photographs of difficult-to-reach places. Invariably, for want of a better description, these were places that were possessed of "spirituality." Izu made "documents" of places of worship as diverse as Easter Island, Teotihuacán, Angkor Wat, Stonehenge, the monuments of the Chinese Silk Road, Palmyra, Mustang, Hampi, the caves of Ajanta, Borobudur, Pagan, and Lhasa. The work was painstakingly slow. Since creating those first images in the 1980s, Izu has continued his travels, making numerous journeys to these out-of-the-way places.

Sacred Places, which follows the success of Still Life, Izu's first book with Arena Editions, represents the first major compilation of these magnificent travel images - images that truly defy simple description. Izu has single-handedly raised photography to a point that was lost somewhere in the nineteenth century. This work springs from the artist's careful scrutiny of the genre of the great nineteenth-century "exotic" photographs of Asia - the work that flourished from the banks of the Nile and Cairo to the quayside of Yokohama between 1859 and 1879."